FAQs

Updated Friday July 29, 2016 by Brookwood Athletic Association Baseball & Softball.

Frequently Asked Questions

Baseball T-Ball Peewee Minor Major Pony Colt
Age Group 5-6 7-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-18
Innings 5 5 6 6 7 7
Game Time 55 min. 75 min. 1 hr. 25 min. 1 hr. 40 min. 1 hr. 50 min. 1 hr. 50 min.
Pitching Coach Machine Player Player Player Player
Pitching Distance 40 ft. 40 ft. 46 ft. 50 ft. 54 ft. 60 ft. 6 in.
Base Length 50 ft. 50 ft. 60 ft. 70 ft. 80 ft. 90 ft.
Stealing No No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Leading Off No No No No Yes Yes
Travel Ball No No No Yes Yes No
Bat Size See Rules See Rules See Rules See Rules See Rules See Rules

Q.  What Baseball League can my child play in?
A.  The Baseball League your child is eligible to play in depends on their age and in which season they are playing. Baseball League ages are calculated based on the child's birth date occurring before or after April 30. If your child is signing up for the Spring season, the comparison date is April 30 of that year (e.g. for the Spring 2017 season, the date is April 30, 2017). If your child is signing up for the Fall season, the comparison date is April 30 of the following year (e.g. for the Fall 2016 season, the date is April 30, 2017). The reason for this is that the Fall season is considered the "moving up" time and the children play in the same Baseball League they will play in for the Spring season of the following year.  To be eligible for the Peanut league, a player must be three years old by January 1st (or June 1st in fall season) of that year.
 

Softball T-Ball Peewee Minor Major Junior Senior
Age Group 5-6 7-8 9-10 11-12 13-14 15-18
Innings 5 5 6 6 7 7
Game Time 55 min. 1 hr. 10 min. 1 hr. 25 min. 1 hr. 25 min. 1 hr. 25 min. 1 hr. 25 min.
Pitching Coach Coach/Kid Player Player Player Player
Pitching Distance 25 ft. 28 ft. 35 ft. 40 ft. 40 ft. 40 ft.
Base Length 50 ft. 50 ft. 60 ft. 60 ft. 60 ft. 60 ft.
Stealing No No Yes Yes Yes Yes
Leading Off No No No No Yes Yes
Travel Ball No No No Yes Yes No

Q.  What Softball League can my child play in?
A.  The Softball League your child is eligible to play in depends on their age on January 1 of the year they are playing.

Q.  What is the Registration fee?
A.  The Spring registration fee is $165 per child for both baseball and softball. Our Peanut League is $135.00.
   The Fall registration fee is $150 per child for both baseball and softball. Our Peanut League is $120.00.

Q.  What does my registration fee cover?
A.  The registration fee covers the normal operating expenses of the leagues. Since BAAB is a not-for-profit organization, we only charge what is necessary to pay normal operating expenses -- nothing more. However, there are expenses incurred that are outside the scope of normal operating expenses -- some examples are tractors, pitching mounds, etc. These expenses are covered by your patronage of the concession stands. Any monies over the amount needed for a league's expenses are channeled back into the leagues. BAAB continues to strive to keep its fees as low as feasible to allow as many children to participate as possible.

Q.  How can I volunteer to coach?
A.  We welcome parents who wish to donate their time and talents as managers and coaches. When you register your family, including the adult members via the website, you will see a button to Apply to Coach/Volunteer. After clicking this button, select the program for which you want to volunteer on the next page and follow the prompts. You will be asked to give permission for a background check and the BAAB Board must approve all managers as selected by the League Directors. Preference is given to those who have managed or coached before with BAAB. We almost always have a need for additional people, so please sign up at registration and you will likely be given an opportunity to experience one of life's greatest joys...coaching a youth sport.

Q.  What equipment should I buy?
A.  Each child is required to have his/her own "NOCSAE" approved batting helmet with a facemask. In addition, the following recommendations can be used to guide you in equipping your child to play safely and happily:

It is strongly recommended that all children playing in baseball leagues higher than TeeBall be equipped with an athletic supporter/cup device.

Glove -- Each child should also have a glove that fits snugly and is flexible enough to hold a ball without assistance from the child's hand.

Bat -- While a personal bat is not necessary, it is usually the most important requirement in a child's mind. If you decide to purchase a bat, make sure that it is light enough for the child to swing easily and quickly. The child should be able to hold it parallel to the ground with only one arm for several seconds without straining. If the bat dips toward the ground, it is too heavy.        

Cleats -- While again not a necessity, cleats can make a huge difference in your child's enjoyment of the game. They provide a good grip on the dirt and help the child control their movement on the field. Cleats should fit just like tennis shoes and must have rubber cleats. Metal spikes are not allowed except in the Colt age group.

Q.  When should I arrive at the field?
A.  While each team's manager sets his own guidelines, generally you should have your child at the field on game days at least 20 minutes before game time. This is important to allow the players to put on their "game face" and warm up -- many late arriving players do not perform well when they arrive just in time to bat or take the field. On-time attendance at practices is also necessary; thus, plan to be at the practice site at least 5 minutes before the start time of practice. Once again, consult your team's manager/coach for their specific guidelines.


Passing Thoughts

"Alone At The Plate"

She pulls on a helmet, picks up the bat,
   and walks to the plate, "gotta hit and that's that."
The crowd starts to yell, the game's on the line,
   last inning, two outs, the score's nine to nine.
Dad yells, "Go get it," Mom wrings her hands,
   coach hollers, "hit it," but alone there she stands.
Heroes are made in seconds such as this,
   but she's just a little girl, what if she should miss?
Years after this game's ended and she's little no more,
   will she remember the outcome or even the score?
No she'll have forgotten if she was out, hit, or a run,
   she'll only look back on her friends and the fun.
So cheer this girl on, alone with her fate;
   help her remember with fondness this stand at the plate.
Spend your time wisely and help in her quest
   to be a hitter with confidence and always her best.
And when the game's over, this girl can stand tall,
   for you've helped her prepare to give it her all!


"Making a Man"

He stands at the plate with his heart pounding fast;
   The bases are loaded; the die has been cast.
Mom and Dad cannot help him; he stands all alone.
   A hit, at this moment, would send the teams home.
The ball nears the plate; he swings and he misses;
   There's a groan from the crowd, with some boos and some hisses.
A thoughtless voice cries, "Strike out the bum."
   Tears fill his eyes; the game's no longer fun.
Remember, he's just a little boy who stands all alone,
   So open your heart and give him a break,
For it's moments like this a man you can make.
   Keep this in mind when you hear someone forget;
He's just a little boy and not a man yet.